Dad by Sharon Cooper

We always love seeing how people put the knowledge they've learned at SNAP into practice.  Following Hannah Millard's session on filming for photographers, we've seen a whole load of beautiful films popping up on our feed and we love that our SNAPsters are embracing something new.  

One of the most wonderful and emotive films we've seen is Sharon Cooper's film portrait of her dad. 

Do hit HD before you watch!
 

Here's what Sharon had to say about the process.

I love video and admire Hannah's skills, my main (learning) reason for returning to Snap for the second year(other than just enjoying the whole event) was Hannah's class. She showed how she selected sections of what she had filmed, and how our creative eye for a still image can be transferred to spotting a memorable and poignant video clip.

I also had a 121 with Hannah at SNAP and showed her a short film of my daughter's birthday. Hannah gave me such great feed back and encouragement about that. I knew right away I wanted to create a film to document a day of my Dad's life. He's 88 and he is awesome, positive, stoic and lovely.

He loved having me there the whole day. From 8am until late in the evening. I took him to vote. Took them out for lunch and they did so much. It was so interesting seeing how hard things are for him yet how stoic he is about everything and never complaining. I imagined it was going to be all "daytime Tv and puzzles" but they have an active life and play Sequence every night. I learned more about their day to day routine. As well as more about filming. 

SNAP and Hannah pushed me to make this. I was worried he would not like/enjoy or see it how I did. But my dad loved it. Very much.

I love that film can stir emotion in a deeper way than one static image possibly can.

I'm looking forward to putting my skills in to practice in my business.  One of my couples later this year had asked if I could film a few video snippets. Filming this personal work allowed me to challenge myself, to learn and to hone my film skills without the pressure of an actual wedding day.